06.01.06

The Hungry Cabbie Eats The Outer Boroughs: New Park Pizza

Posted in Howard Beach, Italian, La Pizza, Posts For Gothamist, Queens at 12:08 am by Administrator

I’ve begun a twice weekly column in www.Gothamist.com as their outer borough food writer. Take a look at the very first post ever today at:

http://www.gothamist.com/archives/2006/05/31/new_park_pizzer.php

Visit www.famousfatdave.com for a laugh or to book an eating tour.

8 Comments »

  1. Kelly C. said,

    June 1, 2006 at 2:49 am

    Yeah, Dave! Man. Now there’s even more of you to read. And love.

  2. acmr said,

    June 1, 2006 at 8:22 pm

    Did you read all the posts from that article? I think it took a beating. It does seem difficult to separate the food from “where” the food is being served. As a writer, I know you would not respond to that. So are you going to modify your writing style to somehow be more sensitive about the neighborhoods where you find your gastronomic delights? Just curious.

    Why can’t we all just hold hands, sing Kumbayah, and have another slice of that nice pizza???

  3. Marlena said,

    June 1, 2006 at 9:27 pm

    I think that discussion is ludicrous. He’s talking about pizza, not secret meetings at the Maxwell House, for Pete’s ever-loving sake.

    One of the great joys of Dave’s blog (and of Dave himself) is that he’s able to see the historical significance behind each tasty morsel, let you know a bit about the backgroud, and then judge the food for itself. I bet if he hadn’t filled in the readers of the unsavory (ok, sick) background of that community, many of them would have never thought of it.

    Stand tough, Dave–you racist bastard.

  4. Administrator said,

    June 1, 2006 at 9:28 pm

    Acmr,

    I love Howard Beach. I lived 10 minutes from there for a year and spent a lot of time there. But then I’m not black. Stuff like what Nick Minnuci did really pisses me and off (as it does any good person), so I thought I’d say something about. Turns out all I had to do was mention it and it got people’s blood boiling. It’s actually the effect I was looking for. I have no intention of separating the food from “where” the food is being served. That is what I’m all about.

    So no, I’m not changing the style and sugar-coating things. I admit the first one shoudn’t have been so negative though. Most people latched onto “lynch mob” “race riots” “hate crimes” “raging third world genocide” “as the towers burned” and such and ran with it. Gothamist commenters are notoriously wacky. It’s the same 20 people every time I’m told. I couldn’t even follow some of the trains of thought going on in those comments.

    Anyway, New Park has phenomenal pizza and you’d love it if you went. I just tried to go back yesterday on an eating tour (just missed closing time). The next Gothamist post on Saturday will be all happy images of Irishmen and gushing fire hydrants and body surfing and boardwalks and beaches and huge messy heroes.

    ~Dave

  5. RONW said,

    June 2, 2006 at 9:23 am

    IMO, the commentary over there is sort of invigorating. I’ve about had it with kiss-ass comment pages. “Nice post, ect.” “Ouhh and Ahhh.” Let’s stick to talking shop for a change.

  6. Marlena said,

    June 2, 2006 at 1:38 pm

    It seems that comments on blogs fall into two categories: ones like this blog, where people like to add on their own suggestions and ask questions (see: an adult discussion) and ones where everyone posts things like “You’re fat and your hair looks stupid LOL! LOL! Team Brangelina!!”

    I, too, love a little saucy discourse. I’d just prefer it to be based in something we can all have a word in. Gothamist isn’t going to solve racism anytime soon and especially not with snarky xenophobic comments that shoot down the discussion before it even gets started.

    Can’t we all just look to Team Brangelina’s example in these times of trial?

  7. Kelly C. said,

    June 2, 2006 at 4:04 pm

    Because expressing admiration and support = kissing ass.

  8. Sloane said,

    June 3, 2006 at 1:05 am

    Apparently someone was not held enough as a child. Invigoration is in the eye of the beholder, I suppose.

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